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The Margaret

From the historic nomination through the beginning stages of construction, the Margaret was the most extensive project I worked on at Alley Poyner Macchietto. The Margaret was a very complex small building involving many outside partners and technical requirements.

APMA was hired to nominate the building, taking advantage of historic tax credits for its renovation. Historic Nominations require three applications – Part 1, which serves as an initial screening as to whether the building may be considered for historic registration, Part 2, which describes the current condition of the structure and extensively outlines the plans for renovation and Part 3 which documents the construction and final result. When I joined the project in 2009, Part 1 had already been submitted for the Margaret but the building had deteriorated significantly since the initial submittal a few years before. We had to re-submit Part 1, alongside the application for Part 2. After the Part 2 submittal was accepted and changes were made, our team set off to assemble construction documents.

Our client had funding grants to make the Margaret a project following sustainable guidelines and low-income housing on top of the historic requirements. Weekly meetings with the OEDC were lively addressing design issues from geothermal drilling to obtaining a sustainable flooring product made in the USA. In the end, the design challenges made this project a rewarding endeavor.

Principal: Perry Poyner. Project Architects: Martin Kluck and Jennifer Honebrink. Drafting and Interior Design: Jean Vacha, Katrina Stoffel and Emily Van Court. Construction Administration: Dennis Nielsen. Hand Elevation Rendering: Mike Thompson. Sketch-up concept renderings: Bruce Yoder. Images courtesy Alley Poyner Macchietto Architecture.

BRIEF

TYPE

Architecture, Built Work, Historic

CLIENT

Omaha Economic Development Corporation (OEDC)

SOFTWARE

AutoCAD, Sketchup

SUSTAINABLE ELEMENTS

Adaptive Reuse, Geothermal Heating, Solar-Thermal Hotwater Heating, and Locally-made Material Selection